Exhibition of alluring beauty!

Lake Arthur Hill

Also popularly known as Bhandardara Lake; came into existence when Wilson dam was built across Pravara River. Set like a huge jewel amidst dense canopied forests of the Sahyadri hills at a height of 750 meters, this clear and placid lake is one of the country’s largest lakes. The water level continues to be maintained by the river water and rainfall. Boating activities are also conducted on this lake.

Wilson Dam

Built across River Pravara, the Dam is a powerful testimony to the engineering skills of days gone by. Situated at a height of 150 meters above sea level It is one of the oldest dams in the country. The opening of sluice gates creates two 60 to 80 feet cascades of water that plummet to the rocks below creating a spectacular sight. The catchment area of this dam is 122 Sq. km. (47 Sq. miles). This dam consists of a spillway of 198 m. (650 ft.). The radial gates adjacent to the spillway, controls the dam storage of 313 Mcum. (11039 Mcft.).

At the base of the Dam there is a garden endowed with thick greenery, streams and gigantic trees- the latter, home to hundreds of harmless fruit bats that hang precariously from the branches all through the day.

Umbrella Falls (Seasonal)

This artificial waterfall is formed when one of the sluice gates from the Wilson Dam is opened (when water levels rise above acceptable limits during the monsoons or whenever water is needed for irrigation). It is vaguely umbrella-shaped as it fans out over the rocks. A pathway takes you from the park at the foot of the dam to within drenching distance of the falls.

Randha Falls (Seasonal)

Is the third leading falls in India. The roaring River Pravara descends down from a height of 170 ft into a beautiful gorge. On the other side of the waterfall is a deep valley with gigantic beehive. The tribal climb down using rope ladders to collect honey.

Agasti Rishi Ashram

Situated on the bank of the Pravara River, this legendary dwelling finds a place in the scripts of the Ramayana. Different mythical stories are associated with Rishi Agasti. According to the one, Agasti Rishi gave lord Rama a miraculous arrow by which he killed Ravana. Legend also has it that the Rishi meditated here for a year, living only on water and air.

Mount Kalsubai

A trekker's paradise; towering over Bhandardara like a watchful sentinel at almost 5500 feet above the sea, it is the highest peak in Maharashtra. The peak is said to take its name from a Koli girl named Kalsu.

Kalsu, according to the story, was fond of wandering in the forest. One day she came to a village at the foot of the hill and took service with a Koli family on condition that she should not be asked to clean pots or to sweep. One day, one of the family ordered Kalsu to clean some pots and clear away some Utter. Immediately after being forced to do this, she climbed the hill and stayed on its top till her death.

The peak has a small temple dedicated to Devi Kalsu on the bit of platform only a few yards in circumference, with an old well in its backyard. Many Kolis worship her as their household goddess.

Amruteshwar Temple

This temple dates back to 1100 AD. The chief object of interest is its construction. The intricately carved temple was built in a distinct Hemadpanti style. The Sculpture is an architectural form or a style, which is named after its introducer and founder, the prime minister named Hemādri Pandit, also known as Hemādpant in the court of Seuna Yadavas of Devagiri. The period of discovery was during the 13th Century in Maharashtra. Main ingredient in the construction includes the black stone, which is locally available.

This thousand-year-old Temple, which houses an idol of Lord Shiva, has a very high dome over the shrine. In front of the shrine door is a handsome canopy. The inside of the shrine looks modern, but the rest of the temple inside and outside is covered with handsome and elaborate carving. It is a 50-minute boat ride from the shores of Arthur Lake. The boat-ride itself is mesmerizing, passing by and through lake-side vegetation.